Glen Coburn Hutcheson: Boxers and Friends

Glen Coburn Hutcheson: Boxers and Friends, July 3-August 2, 2020, The Front gallery, 6 Barre St., Montpelier. Opening reception will be in-person with limited occupancy from 5-7pm, July 3; and online on Facebook Live. There will be a virtual artist talk via zoom on July 21 at 7pm (please email us if you’d like to attend). In-person viewing by appointment or Fridays 4-7, Saturdays and Sundays 11-2; we ask visitors to wear masks and not to visit if they have had signs of illness. More about the show…

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Glen Coburn Hutcheson: Boxers and Friends

Glen Coburn Hutcheson: Boxers and Friends, July 3-August 2, 2020, The Front gallery, 6 Barre St., Montpelier. There will be a virtual artist talk via zoom on July 21 at 7pm (please email us if you’d like to attend). In-person viewing by appointment or Fridays 4-7, Saturdays and Sundays 11-2; we ask visitors to wear masks and not to visit if they have had signs of illness. For more information email info@thefrontvt.com or call 802-552-0877. [foogallery id=”2543″] Glen Coburn Hutcheson’s new work marks a turn towards the personal. In his series of sculptures, he makes abstract forms out of starched clothing – often his own discarded t-shirts and boxers. The forms twist, grow, and embody the same sense of spontaneity as his earlier series of colorful squiggle paintings. Hutcheson has often returned to the body and to a traditional approach to painting and drawing the figure from life. With these works, he references classical sculptures, where the human form is revealed through careful attention to the folds and draping of fabric, while leaving out the body entirely. The result suggests the body without being restricted to its proportions or movement. The abstractions he creates are on first impression formally intriguing and visually dynamic, but then the viewer gets hit with the realization that these are old boxers; the sculptures are funny and intimate. They speak to the weird dynamics of art (and sculpture in particular) as an expensive, inaccessible luxury for many, but often created by those who cannot afford to purchase it. Hutcheson’s pricing formula, which works on a sliding scale, seeks to change both the perceptions and realities of who can afford to own art. Some of the sculptures seem like characters, and that sensibility continues in Hutcheson’s comics. Tiny vignettes of his own world-in-lockdown, the cartoons come across as specific but familiar – the dog always home, the sourdough starter gradually becoming sentient. In all of this work, there’s a snapshot of a particular moment seen in fabric frozen mid-move or a character’s thought bubble, but also a sense of the span of time, like the t-shirt that hangs around past its prime or the endlessness of lockdown. Hutcheson’s combination of artistic skill and jokey humor will give viewers something surprising, beautiful, and meaningful – but that also doesn’t take itself too seriously. We hope you’ll find it a respite, and a relief.

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Black Lives Matter.

The Front is a cooperative gallery, founded on cooperative ideals. In that spirit, we stand together with protesters across the nation against violence, racism, and police brutality. Our goal is to showcase individual artistic voices in an inclusive, supportive, and welcoming environment. We believe art can be a medium for social change, and we see that happening around us, from murals around the world honoring George Floyd to the removal of confederate statues in Virgina. Art is meant to provoke and invite dialogue; even though our doors are currently closed, we’re interested in listening. If you are an artist of color and would like to be involved at the Front, let us know. If you would like to support artists of color, here are some great places to learn and donate. We hope we’ll be seeing you soon – in the meantime, stay safe. Don’t stay silent.

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We’ll miss you, Ray.

We are all deeply saddened by the passing of one of our members, Ray Brown, on March 13, 2020. Ray was a wonderful person and a valued member of our community, and will be sorely missed. We have extended his solo show, Ray Brown: Tumbling Toward the End, through April, though we are closed until April 6 to do our part against Coronavirus. We will be screening the film Ray Brown: Portrait of an Artist once the gallery opens to the public; stay tuned or sign up for our mailing list for details. To read more about Ray, please see his obituary on Seven Days, who have also published a review of his show, as have the Times-Argus.

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Show 38

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Show 38 will look a little different – but we’re excited about it all the same! This show will be a rotating display of new works by members viewable through the gallery’s windows; each week will feature work by a different artist. This means we can simultaneously present a new show and adhere to the current social distancing guidelines. New art work will go up on Friday mornings and will remain on display for one week. The show will be open through May and June. Our six new members make their debut: a huge welcome to Cathy Cone, Erica Cummings, PJ Desrochers, Sandy Mayo, Sam Thurston, and Autumn Tomlinson. Celebrate our 5th birthday on May 1st! The party starts at 12:30 on Instagram and Facebook.[foogallery id=”2491″]

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Ray Brown: Tumbling toward the End

The show has been extended through April 26; however, the gallery will be closed (open by appointment only) until April 6 due to Coronavirus precautions. The film screening of Ray Brown: Portrait of an Artist has been postponed, date and time TBA. Ray Brown passed away peacefully on March 13; we were so grateful to have the honor of working with him on this show. Please feel free to peruse the show virtually, and contact us if you wish to purchase or make an appointment to see the works in person. [foogallery id=”2402″] Ray Brown: Tumbling toward the End, the first solo show presented at the Front, takes its title from the last collection of poems by Vermont poet David Budbill – a volume that, like Ray Brown’s work, considers beauty together with imminent mortality, and what it means to have a fleeting present and a fickle body. Brown, who has been a fixture of the Montpelier art scene for many years, has been a member of the Front since 2018. He is the first of our members to present a solo show as part of the gallery’s new format, which will alternate between all-member group shows and solo shows every month, with openings on the first Friday of the month. As part of the exhibition, we will present a free screening of “Portrait of an Artist,” the feature length documentary film about Brown by filmmaker Nat Winthrop, on Sunday, March 22 at 2:00 at the gallery. The works Ray Brown presents in this show are all from the past fifteen years, since a stroke at age sixty-five changed the way he paints – he learned to use his left arm instead of his right – as well as the way he thinks and uses his memory. Now at age seventy-nine, he is still inspired by the visible world, loosely basing compositions on the golden mean – a ratio of proportions often found in nature and widely used in renaissance painting. These works, many of which are being shown for the first time, cover a wide range of subject matter and styles, from still-lifes and flowers to large abstractions based on travels through Italy. Despite this diversity, Brown’s dedication to composition and his creative use of color are what unite his work. When viewing multiple canvases together, you can see how the elements of composition in a still life or grouping

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